Coverage Trends

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Brief

New health insurance coverage estimates for Q1-Q2 2018 from the National Health Interview Survey find nationwide, 12.5% of nonelderly adults were uninsured in the first half of 2018.

Graphic

Data from the 2017 American Community Survey (ACS) show that many of the remaining uninsured are clustered in metropolitan areas; this map illustrates those geographic concentrations of the uninsured.

Commentary

This national scan summarizes the health care reforms and innovations that newly-elected governors promoted in their campaigns and may become policy in 2019.

Brief

11.2018 / By Urban Institute

This monitoring and tracking project will document changes to the implementation of national health reform to help states, researchers and policymakers learn from the process as it unfolds.

Report

11.2018 / By Urban Institute

Using data from the American Community Survey and the Current Population Survey, this report assesses whether coverage gains from 2010 to 2016 were associated with changes in labor market outcomes across occupations.

Report

This resource highlights articles published since January 2018 that report on the impact of Medicaid expansion in 33 states and DC, organized by health access and outcomes, economic impacts, and coverage impacts.

Report

The brief provides a roadmap of policy, program design, and financing considerations for states that are contemplating development of a state-based reinsurance program under 1332 waiver authority.

Report

10.2018 / By Urban Institute

This report explores changes in coverage type between 2013 and 2016 overall and for key demographic and income subgroups. Between 2013 and 2016, the share of Americans ages 64 and younger without health insurance fell from 17 percent to 10 percent.

Brief

10.2018 / By Urban Institute

This brief examines changes in health insurance coverage and health care access and affordability for parents and their children between 2013 and 2018 using data from the Health Reform Monitoring Survey.

Brief

These tables of state and county uninsurance estimates for 2017 and comparison year 2016 come from the 2017 American Community Survey via the U.S. Census Bureau's American FactFinder tool.

Graphic

New health insurance coverage estimates from the American Community Survey show that there was a statistically significant 0.2 percentage point increase in the national uninsured rate between 2016 and 2017, for the first year since 2010. This graphic analyzes the data.

Report

09.2018 / By Urban Institute

As federal and state policymakers weigh changes to federal programs that help low-income people meet their basic needs for food, medical care and shelter, they run the risk of increasing material hardship, which could have detrimental short- and long-term impacts on children and adults.

Report

09.2018 / By Urban Institute

This report provides detailed estimates of changes in health insurance coverage types between 2013 and 2016 by demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics. In addition, state fact sheets detail coverage changes by income group in all 50 states and DC.

Graphic

This chart compares the social determinants 11 states targeted in their Medicaid contracts and contract guidance documents to enhance population health, as well as how states monitored outcomes and funded these efforts.

Report

08.2018 / By Urban Institute

The Trump administration finalized regulations for short-term limited duration policies in early August 2018, which increase the maximum length of short-term, limited-duration insurance policies to just less than one year. This report provides updated tables taking these state legislative changes into account.

Report

08.2018 / By Urban Institute

This report examines brokers’ evolving role in the individual market, consumer purchasing decisions, and brokers’ observations about how the market and consumers are responding to recent federal policy adjustments to the ACA.

Report

08.2018 / By Urban Institute

This report investigates the work patterns of Medicaid beneficiaries in Kentucky who are are potentially subject to Medicaid work requirements. It finds that the structure of Kentucky’s Medicaid waiver does not seem to align with the reality of some working enrollees’ lives, and that working enrollees losing coverage may not have access to an employer plan.

Report

07.2018 / By Urban Institute

The ACA has made considerable gains in health insurance coverage, but many remain uninsured. This is an update to a 2015 analysis of the characteristics of the remaining uninsured, focusing on people uninsured in 2017 as well as how the characteristics of this population have changed.

Report

06.2018 / By Urban Institute

To understand the marketplace enrollment gains and losses observed in 2018 relative to 2017, the Urban Institute interviewed key stakeholders in Rhode Island, Washington, and New York, which saw marketplace enrollment increases, and in West Virginia and Louisiana, which saw enrollment drops. This report explains the different features of the five states, presents cross-state findings, and discusses important factors in next year’s open enrollment period.

Journal Article

This article uses data from the American Community Survey to examine changes in uninsurance and uninsurance disparities by race/ethnicity in Kentucky since the state’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act. It was published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Journal Article

05.2018 / By Urban Institute

We assessed rates of employer health insurance offer, take-up, and coverage in June 2013 and March 2017 among workers. Overall, offer rates remained stable, and take-up and coverage rates increased. In Medicaid expansion states, the share of workers with family incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level who had employer-based coverage held steady, while uninsurance rates declined.

Journal Article

The six household surveys documented in this article cover a broad array of health topics, including health insurance coverage (American Community Survey, Current Population Survey), health conditions and behaviors (National Health Interview Survey, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System), health care utilization and spending (Medical Expenditure Panel Survey), and longitudinal data on public program participation (SIPP).

Journal Article

04.2018 / By Urban Institute

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) made private nongroup health insurance more accessible to nonelderly adults with chronic conditions through the federal and state-based Marketplaces. As repeal of the ACA individual mandate takes effect in 2019, protecting coverage gains while stabilizing nongroup premiums may depend on state-level efforts to spread the risk of enrollees’ health care costs across a balanced insurance pool.

Report

04.2018 / By Urban Institute

The Profile of Virginia’s Uninsured provides a detailed picture of the Commonwealth’s uninsured using the 2016 American Community Survey. In 2016, 10.3 percent of Virginians under age 65 were uninsured. Most of these uninsured nonelderly Virginians had family incomes at or below 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), and more than three-quarters were part of working families.

Webinar & Presentations

Watch: Results of the 2017 Minnesota Health Access Survey.

Journal Article

This paper examines a 2008 survey of adults enrolled in Minnesota's public health care programs to study the effect of barriers to health care access and the magnitude of those barriers on health care utilization. The authors found that multiple types of barriers are associated with delayed and foregone care, with system-level barriers and discrimination having the greatest effect on health care seeking behavior.

Graphic

This analysis examines educational attainment and access to health care, looking at the extent to which adults (25 years and older) with different levels of education skipped needed care due to cost and did not have a personal doctor.

Report

03.2018 / By Urban Institute

Although congressional efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) did not succeed in 2017, the law continues to face an uncertain future. This brief examines insurers’ participation and pricing decisions for the 2018 and 2019 plan years through structured interviews with 10 insurance companies participating in the individual market in 28 states and the District of Columbia.

Report

03.2018 / By Urban Institute

On February 20, 2018, the Departments of Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services released a proposed regulation that would increase the maximum length of short-term, limited-duration insurance policies to one year. The brief analyzes the national and state-specific effects of ending the individual mandate and loosening limits on short-term, limited-duration policies.

Brief

This issue brief summarizes key features of the February 9, 2018 10-year CHIP extension. CHIP covers nearly 9 million children and is a key contributor to record-low levels of uninsurance among children.

Report

This report summarizes findings from the 2017 Minnesota Health Access Survey, focusing on trends in how Minnesotans obtained health insurance coverage, and provides an understanding of how the 2017 climate may have contributed to a contraction of coverage.

Report

This report examines the issue that with no individual mandate and expanded non-comprehensive coverage, the divisions between states will deepen, and market conditions will deteriorate for unsubsidized farmers and others seeking coverage in states that don’t protect their risk pool.

Report

Prior to the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Minnesota's health insurance market was relatively high-functioning across indicators of health insurance access and quality of care, although the state faced common challenges in the area of health care costs. This report considers Minnesota's health insurance market before and after the passage of the ACA and the outlook for the state's market given the current policy environment.

Webinar & Presentations

This webinar features the Urban Institute's Dr. Fred Blavin, whose SHARE-funded research asks how medical spending burdens for near-poor families in non-expansion states would change if the states were to expand Medicaid.

Brief

CMS released two informational bulletins detailing a new, streamlined approach for the review and management of Section 1115 demonstrations and state plan amendments and 1915 waivers. The streamlined approach may enhance states' ability to design innovative health care delivery initiatives in their Medicaid programs. These changes come at a critical time as states develop new approaches to reduce health care costs and stem the opioid epidemic.

Brief

HHS released proposed changes in its annual notice that governs standards for issuers and the health insurance marketplaces. The annual notice is one of the most significant tools the Administration wields in shaping the health insurance markets and this proposed notice carries significant implications for markets and states.

Brief

Understanding premium increases for individual market plans is more complicated this year. In many states, carriers attempted to recapture that lost revenue by increasing the premium of the silver plan relative to other metals. ‘Silver-loading’ gives subsidized non-cost-sharing reduction (CSR) consumers the opportunity to purchase a relatively more affordable bronze or gold plan.

Webinar & Presentations

The research included in this panel illustrates both the intended and unintended consequences of state policy decisions on a range of health systems outcomes and highlights the necessity of access to different types of federal surveys for the purposes of health policy evaluation. Federal survey data is especially critical when analyzing variation between states, as when comparing outcomes by Medicaid expansion status. As policy flexibility for states continues to grow, this ability to compare states to one another will continue to be essential.

Brief

Sens. Lamar Alexander (TN) and Patty Murray (WA) released a bipartisan bill designed to bring short-term stability to the health insurance market. While there are indications that Alexander and Murray secured the 60 votes needed for passage in the Senate, it faces an uncertain fate in the House and with the President. 

Brief

The prospects for these new players reflect tensions for the market as a whole. Clearly the massive number of net exits signals a retrenchment by many market participants in 2018, resulting in shrinking of territorial footprints and outright withdrawal by large parts of the industry. For a variety of reasons, including attempts to repeal the ACA, the potential of the individual market has not yet been fully realized. Yet, it still remains the source of coverage for millions of people.

Report

This report provides an annual update to comparisons of uninsurance estimates from four federal surveys:
-The American Community Survey (ACS)
-The Current Population Survey (CPS)
-The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey - Household Component (MEPS-HC)
-The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

Report

This SHADAC chartbook uses data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) to highlight the experiences of private-sector workers with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) from 2012 through 2016 at the national level and in the states. The ESI chartbook is accompanied by state-level fact sheets summarizing key ESI characteristics from 2012 to 2016.

Brief

While there are risks to the stability of their markets that states cannot well control, one important route to adverse market outcomes may be state policy decisions. There are frequent calls for more state flexibility, but these data suggest that the exercise of existing state flexibility is one way that states have visited a considerable amount of trouble upon their markets. Yet there is a hopeful note here as well, since this suggests that there are steps that states can take to improve their situation.

Brief

The data thus far suggest that most counties will have at least two insurers offering plans on the exchange, and most people will be able to choose from at least three.

Brief

06.2017 / By Urban Institute

Mental health and substance use coverage could roll back to pre-Affordable Care Act (ACA) levels if the American Health Care Act (AHCA) becomes law. Analysis finds the AHCA could limit access to mental health treatment.

Report

04.2017 / By Urban Institute

Before the ACA’s implementation, nearly one million veterans—almost one in 10—were uninsured. By 2015, the number of uninsured veterans fell to 552,000. Veterans uninsurance reduced by nearly 40 percent between 2013 and 2015 under the Affordable Care Act.

Webinar & Presentations

Watch: Webinar discussing the impact of ACA implementation in Kentucky.

Journal Article

This article examines changes to health insurance coverage and access to health care among children, adolescents, and young adults since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act using data from the National Health Interview Survey. The authors found significant improvements in coverage among children, adolescents, and young adults since 2010, along with some gains in access.

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